A Hope for Last Year’s Husks

Last year is gone, leaving in its wake a menagerie of “husks,”  

for which there is yet hope. 

“Wherever there are bright new wings, there’s always the ‘husk of waiting’ somewhere in the corner,” says author Sue Monk Kidd in reference to the spiritual art of cocooning.

Life is full of cocoons.  We die and are reborn again and again.

Therefore, there are always discarded “husks of waiting,” in the corners of our lives.  There is hope, however, for the further usefulness of these husks if, instead of leaving them in the corners of our lives, we celebrate them as trophies and give them a place of honor in our lives.

Then, every time we view our husks as trophies, they can remind us of our triumphs, and we can remember what we discarded, created, gained, or learned while we lived in our “husks of waiting.”  We can also celebrate the metamorphosis or the transformation of life that occurred and the new life that emerged from those husks.

“If I have inside me the stuff to make cocoons, maybe the stuff of butterflies is there too.”

Taking Trina Paulus’ quotation one step further, I say, “If I have inside me the stuff to make cocoons and butterflies, maybe the stuff to make trophies from the cocoons is there too.”

Even though cocoons or husks often represent dark or negative times in my life; nonetheless, they were a part of my life, and I try to celebrate and honor all parts of my life by attaching positive outcomes to negative experiences.  That is why I like the idea of transforming husks into trophies.

Here is a short list of “husk of waiting” trophies:

Husk of Mistakes Trophy:  Knowledge emerged from my mistakes.

Husk of Failures Trophy:  Triumph and success emerged out of my failures.

Husk of Shortcomings Trophy:  Self-forgiveness emerged from my shortcomings.

Husk of Sorrow Trophy:  Sorrow gave me a greater knowledge and appreciation of joy.

Husk of Grief or Loss Trophy:  Compassion and empathy emerged from grief and loss.

Husk of Fears Trophy:  Faith emerged out of the husks of fear.

Husk of Suffering and Pain Trophy:  Comfort and/or healing emerged out of suffering and pain.

Husk of Poverty Trophy:  Gratitude emerged out of periods of poverty.

As well as many other people, I still have a few 2011 “husks of waiting” in my life.  In 2012, I not only want to emerge transformed from these husks, but I hope for a day soon when I can drag the husks out of the corners of my life and honor them.

I hope to transform my “husks of waiting” into trophies that serve, in the new year and my new life, as reminders of their meaningful and useful purpose.

Have you learned the purpose for any of your “husks of waiting,” which you are willing to share with readers?  If so, I hope you will share about it in the Comment Section below, or you also could leave a comment to let me know you read and enjoyed the article.

Happy New Year, Connie

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2 comments on “A Hope for Last Year’s Husks

  1. Kate Kresse says:

    I have husks of grief and loss. These are long enough ago that what remains is sweet memories of the people who died, and the compassion to reach out to others in their grief and loss. During the time when our daughter was ill and died, so many people reached out to us, lifted us up, walked with us through our grief process. There is no way to be bitter and remain downhearted when people of faith literally surround you with love. I hadn’t thought of the trophy aspect of it—but it is a good way to put it. Survivors that truly survive do so with a suit of inner joy that overcomes the sorrow.

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